cleverchickadee


Vegan Curry: a Slow Cooker Recipe by quornflour

So we had this lunch at work. I was going to make some curried mussels, but then I got to worrying.

I kept thinking how the crockpots were not going to get hot enough to get the mussels hot enough to cook, and what if someone got a bad one…

Well by that point it was too late to change up the protein, so I decided to just leave out the mussels all together.

Trouble is, when you take the mussels out, then you end up with a lot of space so you need a new filler.

I personally HATE eggplant. It is not just the texture or the flavor it is both. Lucky for me, lots of people really like it.

So here is what you are going to need for a 5 quart slow cooker:

  • 6 cans of coconut milk
  • 1 yellow bell pepper
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 orange bell pepper
  • 1 large zucchini (so you have 2 cups when you cut it up)
  • 5 thai eggplants
  • 2 cups fresh green beans
  • 2 tablespoons Thai red curry paste*
  • 8-10 basil leaves gut to grass
  • 6 green onions cut into grass
  • 5 chilies
  • ½ cup of sugar
  • Salt to taste

*When you pick your red curry paste (the Thai Kitchen is most commonly available) you will need to see what the recommendation is for per can of coconut milk. The 2 tablespoons listed above will make this a mild curry, if you like yours with more kick add more.

Now to make this is pretty simple.

  1. Wash and chop your beans into 1 inch pieces
  2. Julienne your peppers and zucchini
  3. Quarter your eggplants (remove the green parts) and then cut those pieces in half so you have about ¾” chunks
  4. Slice the chilies down into small pieces
  5. In your crock pot mix ½ a can of coconut milk with your curry paste to get everything mixed in with no lumps then add the rest of the can and mix it in
  6. Add your sugar and mix it in
  7. Add your eggplant
  8. Add the rest of your coconut milk
  9. Stir and let cook for about an hour on high
  10. Add the rest of the peppers, beans, chilies, basil and zucchini
  11. Let sit until everything is hot
  12. Add green onion
  13. Salt to taste

Serve over rice, it is mild and sweet, even with the chilies in it, if you cannot handle heat then reduce the number of chilies or leave out all together.

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We Got the Beet: a Recipe by quornflour

I love beets. I know a lot of people do not like them, but those people are silly.

One of my favorite ways to cook them is a result of a CSA grocery box years ago.

In this box there were these 4 giant red beets, and a big bunch of collards and a small red onion. The only thing you need to add is 2 tablespoons of butter (or olive oil if you want to make it vegan), a pinch of salt (around 1/8th of a teaspoon) and a quarter cup of water.

  1. chop up your onion into quarter inch pieces
  2. wash and cut your beets into ½ inch pieces
  3. cut your collards in half then into 1 inch strips
  4. in a 4-5 Quart Dutch oven on medium heat melt your butter
  5. caramelize the onions
  6. add the beats and the water
  7. cook until they are soft enough to poke with a fork
  8. add the collards and cook until they brighten

Serve warm.



Binding by quornflour

I am not going to sit here at lie to you and tell you how much I love binging, how easy it is and how I jumped head first into the crocodile pit.

Fact is: I feared it. I let it consume me.

Fear or not, it makes a quilt look so much more finished than one without.

So one day I tried it out. It turned out ok. I learned a lot. I tried different methods, asked people and a lot of trial and error.

That said, the one I just finished was the first after numerous attempts, some better than others that I sat back and said. “Wow that was easy.”

So to spare you all of the failure that I had to endured let me share with you the easiest way to bind.

First. Skip the pre-folded binding you find in the craft store, I still do not understand that stuff. Besides, if you make your own, you can match the fabric with the quilt.

After you have finished piecing, basting and finally quilting or tying off your quilt: trim off all of the uneven edges if there are any and set it aside.

Next with the fabric you want to use to bind, cut it into strips, fabric is usually between 45″-52″ wide so take note of this when you are determining how many strips you will need. Don’t cut the long way, that’s tacky.

I use 3″ strips, it makes a nice thin binging but is also easy to use. For a long time I was using 2″ until I realized that doing that was making me a crazy person.

After you are done cutting get out your iron and iron each piece down the middle (the long way) right side out and then open and iron the sides in so it is ironed into quarters. Fold it up on the ironed seams and re-iron. (I love ironing). You can see the completed ironing in the picture above.

Next you want to attach all of your binding to make one long strip. To do this, take the ends of your binding end to end perpendicular right sides together and sew along the diagonal to make a mitered seam.

Cut off the triangle and open. Repeat this until all of your biding is one piece, if you find that your seams are crooked, take it out and do it again.

Starting in the middle of one side with a tail of about a foot so that you can join the ends when you get near the end, pin If you’re into that) or hold the binding on, and sew in the middle, if you are lined up correctly you will sew both sides at the same time. I like to go around a second time, but that is because it is just sewing straight lines.

To go around the corners fold into triangles and sew, leaving your needle in the down position when turning the corner.

Make sure it is folded evenly on both sides… the back sometimes likes to get a little squirrely.

When you get close to the end, stop about 12″ near where you started. This is the part that gets a little tricky and I forgot to photograph because I was concentrating… basically you are going to overlap the two ends so that they overlap the equivalent length that is the width. If you are using 3″ strips, then it would be a 3 inch overlap. Join the ends the same way you joined the strips earlier. Finish sewing. Easy peasy!

 

 




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