cleverchickadee


Cracker Please: a recipe by quornflour

#vegan #foodporn #recipe @punkrawklabs #food

I like crackers, a little crunch for a snack, but I always feel a little ridiculous for spending good money on fancy crackers.

I had picked up some cashew cheese from Punk Rawk Labs and forgot to get crackers and decided it was time to figure out how to make them myself.

When searching for recipes, I had a problem finding exactly what I wanted, so I took what I learned and headed to the kitchen to, as I love doing in the kitchen… wing it.

One of the things I learned was that uneven shaped crackers which always seem to be a bit fancy are called rustic. Who knew?

Anyway, here is what you need to make really delicious Rustic Sesame Crackers.

  • 1 cup white flour (you also want a little more for rolling the crackers)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoons sesame seeds
  • ½ cup warm water
  • 1/3 cup toasted sesame oil

For topping the crackers before baking you will also need about 2 tablespoons of toasted sesame oil, 2 tablespoons sesame seeds and coarse kosher salt.

  1. Heat your oven to 425◦
  2. In a bowl mix your dry ingredients together so that the salt and baking powder is well mixed in
  3. Add the water and oil and mix into a dough
  4. Set aside covered in a cloth napkin or dish towel for about 5 minutes
  5. Separate into about 4 pieces
  6. Roll each piece thinly and cut using a pizza cutter into pieces about tortilla chip size. Shape can be rough because they are rustic after all.
  7. Place on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper and brush with oil and sprinkle with salt and sesame seeds
  8. Bake for 7-9 minutes, until they are golden brown
  9. Remove from the cookie sheet and cool on a rack
  10. Serve when you need crackers or store in an air tight container

I like to serve them with Punk Rawk Labs Cashew Cheese, the combo makes a perfect snack, they also hold up well to guacamole and salsa.

Now, if you aren’t really into sesame, or get bored with one type of cracker, here are a few delicious alterations that are just as delicious:

  1. Swap out sesame seeds for fresh rosemary and the sesame oil for olive oil
  2. Swap out the seeds with roasted garlic and the oil for garlic infused olive oil
  3. Swap the seeds for 1 tablespoon of finely chopped basil add a tablespoon of parmesan cheese and for the oil use garlic infused olive oil

I could go on and on, but I won’t, I would love to know about other combinations that everyone uses.

 

 



Trial file: Veggie Pie by texaskillet

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So occasionally as you know, I receive recipes in my organics box.  It is important for me to keep most of these, unless they are truly disgusting, and try them out when I have the energy.  This one was really really delish so I thought I would pass it on.

Filling:

4 tbsp oil

1 onion (white, yellow, whatever)

1/2 lb baby bella’s or crimini mushrooms sliced

1 cup of white wine

2 sweet potatoes (or yams)

3 medium carrots chopped up

2 tbsp sage, chopped

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 cup vegetarian broth

salt and pepper

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Image

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Topping:

4 medium yukon gold potatoes, chopped

1 head celery root, peeled and chopped

1 head of cauliflower, chopped

1/4 cup butter

1/2 cup heavy cream

1/2 cup cheddar cheese, grated

1/2 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated

In a large frying pan, heat half of oil over medium high heat.  Saute onions until translucent, about 2-3 minutes, add mushrooms and cook until soft, about 3-4 minutes.  Deglaze with white wine and simmer until wine is almost completely absorbed.  Transfer to bowl.

Heat remaining oil in pan and fry potatoes and carrots until just tender, about 10-12 minutes.  Add sage and garlic and saute for another minute or two then add broth.  Simmer until liquid is reduced by half.  Salt and pepper to taste and then combine with onions and mushrooms.   Set aside.

For topping, steam first three ingredients until easily mashed with a fork, roughly 15-20 minutes.  Mix well with butter and heavy cream, but still chunky.  Fold in Cheddar.

Assemble filling in layers in a 9×9 inch baking dish.  Top with mashed veggies.  Add grated Parmigiano cheese and bake for 20 minutes, or until sides are bubbly and heated through.WP_20121227_008WP_20121227_010

Happy Eating and leftovers most likely for a day or two!  YAY!



Bottle Cap Table by quornflour

A few years back I decided that I needed more color in my life.

If you knew me you might laugh at that statement. Anyway.

I always liked bottle cap art. The way they are used in shrines and other art forms to add a bit of color here and there. So I decided that I wanted to cover a table in them.

One of the things I liked about the idea of a table covered in bottle caps, is that crown caps (most commonly used for beer and “fancy” sodas,) is that they are all the same size.

Most of the instructions I found called for gluing, or putting them in a frame and then covering them with a lacquer or epoxy.

I wanted the texture.

First it came to collecting bottle caps. This table takes roughly 3.8 beers per day for a year, so either get drinking or ask for friends to help.

I had friends all over saving bottle caps for me, so that I could get a nice variety.

Then I picked up some ¾” – 1″ Crown Bolt Weather Strip nails, I got a mix of brass, copper and nickel. The caps are about a ¼” high so you need them to be able to go thru the cap and then into the table. Be careful not to get finishing nails since you will need something with a flat top to lay flush against the cap.

I also needed a table, so I searched on craigslist for the jokkmokk table from IKEA, it is made of pine and fairly inexpensive to start with and a pretty sturdy table, (I also use one for my sewing table).

Often you can find them for around 50-100$ usually missing a chair. It is about 150$ new, so avoid paying more than it sells for in the store.

Really most any pine table would work, this was just fairly cheap and accessible.

Pine is good because the wood is soft enough to pound the nails into and the jokkmokk is just the right size to evenly place bottle caps is you need it to be straight.

So in addition to loads of bottle caps and nails you will need a hammer and needle nose pliers.

Trust me, trying to use your fingers instead of pliers will only lead to tears.

If you want to paint the table, do so before you start. I painted mine black with a matte water based enamel.

Start at a corner and work your way around the table, try to keep them evenly spaced and count to make sure you have the same number along the sides. If you want to be super meticulous you could make a grid, but I was just winging it, so I didn’t.

It is super helpful if you can get a second set of hands for the border to help hold the nails in place, or make some starter caps, by putting the nail into the cap separately so that you can hold it in place with your hand.

Place the nail at the center of the cap holding with the pliers and hammer into place.

Once you have your border in place, lay out the rest of your bottle caps then working your way around the outside of the table work inward, nailing each cap in place. This takes a while, but in the end it is totally worth it.

If you wanted to you could then set these with an epoxy or lay a glass top over it, I didn’t bother because I like the texture and how it ages over time, because the caps are the same size the table top is even.

You may want to invest in a steam pressure cleaner in the event you ever plan to clean this.

I also painted the chairs to add to the color and I use it in my kitchen.

Simplified instructions

You will need:

Getting to work

  1. Place first bottle cap at the corner of the table.
  2. Using needle nose pliers hold nail at the center of the cap, hammer into place.
  3. Works your way around the table into the center, lining up each cap as you go.


Coffee, Coffee, Coffee, Coffee by quornflour

As it turns out, I frequently take pictures of my coffee. Anyone who knows me also knows that I also take pictures of my food before I eat it. Apparently I take pictures of my coffee in various stages of consumption.

Anyway, I am not a huge fan of “perfumed” or flavored coffees, however, recently my friend Sarah came back from Africa and with her brought some cinnamon sticks. Thinking of our coffee breaks one morning recently I dropped a cinnamon stick into the water of my percolator, it made the loveliest cinnamon flavored coffee.

If you don’t have a percolator, soak the stick in a small amount of water and add it to the grinds of your drip maker, or add the water and the stick to your French press (you might have to halve it if it is big).

It is a nice holiday coffee treat without all of the crap that goes into other flavoring.



Fruity Play-Dough: a Recipe by quornflour

Years ago I worked in childcare. The woman I worked for would occasionally make a new batch of play-dough for the kids. It was a simple recipe that was scented and colored with Kool-Aid.

Earlier this year I went looking for that recipe and just could not find anyone who knew it.

Then the other day I was thumbing through an old address book/journal that I had back then. There it was, scrawled on a page. So I figured while I knew where it was I would write it up.

Here is what you will need for each color:

  • 1 cup of flour
  • ½ cup of Salt
  • 1 envelope of Kool-Aid (the kind you add your own sugar in)
  • 2 tablespoons of oil
  • 1 cup of boiling water*

Note: the boiling part is super important, if it isn’t hot enough the dough will end up too watery. If that happens, or you don’t like the consistency add a flour and salt mixture of 2:1 to thicken it up.

  1. put all of the dry ingredients in a small mixing bowl

  1. using a fork, mix them together until you cannot see the color of the Kool-Aid from the rest

  1. add oil and water

  1. mix

  1. mix

  1. mix

  1. roll into a ball

  1. repeat for each color

  1. Play!

It is salty but edible if anyone gets it in their mouths or goes for a taste, which might be tempting for some since it smells so fruity.

When you are done store in an airtight container.



Simple Pasta Salad by quornflour

If I do not have a ton of time when I get home, I like to throw together a quick pasta salad. I like to make this one because it is good both warm and cold, so it travels as left overs really well.

All you need is:

  • 1 cup of cooked pasta
  • 2 table spoons of coarse chopped basil
  • 1 large tomato chopped
  • 2 teaspoons grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 small finely chopped garlic clove
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons of olive oil

Toss it all together and enjoy. Quick, easy, delicious!



Most Delicious Apple (Pie) Sauce by quornflour

Ok, so I only going to share this because my dear friend Missy asked me to post some Thanksgiving, holiday, fall foods. So you can all thank her for this. Else it would have remained a secret for ever and ever.

Now, apple sauce is one of those things that is really quite easy to make. Take some fresh delicious apples, stick them in a pot, turn the heat on medium and let them slowly turn to mush. Easy and delicious.

This is not that apple sauce, this is some most delicious apple sauce that you might lose track of time and forget to make your gingersnaps…

You are going to need a giant bag of apples, like 12 quart bag worth of sauce or pie apples (the farmers market or grocer can tell you which ones are best a present) and a 10 quart pot. Basically, because the apples reduce so much having them start overflowing is not going to be an issue.

Cut the apples in quarters, you are going to use a ricer later on, so you can leave the seeds and skins on and put them in your pot with a ½ Cup of water to start the heating process.

Add:

  • 1 C candied ginger
  • 1 C brown sugar (packed)
  • 6 cinnamon sticks
  • ½ cup spiced rum (the alcohol will burn off if you are concerned about giving this to children, or you can just tell the kids it isn’t for them and they can just deal with that)
  • 1 C Amish Rolled salted butter… yes you read that right, butter.

Now, you do not necessarily want to just use any old butter, if you cannot find Amish butter, then Kerry Gold will suffice, though the Amish butter is the best, it is a wonder they do not all die off of heart disease on account of just how delicious it is.

On medium heat, let them cook down, keep an eye and must them down now and again until you can fit the lid on. Stirring occasionally, let them cook down.

Once they are mush, use a ricer to get out the giant chunks of things, really, you could also just throw it in the blender too.

I sent this to a friend of mine who opened it, “just to try a taste”, next thing she knew it was gone. I can tell you I was overjoyed at the end of a crap day to find the last jar in a pile of other goodness I Had canned, so can this and hide some, or use it as a gift, because seriously, it is some good stuff.




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