cleverchickadee


Stuff we Love: Self-Filtering Water Bottles by quornflour

TxK and I both travel a fair amount and we both like to keep hydrated. With all of the post 9/11 regulations, bringing a water bottle into the airport is pretty much impossible. Of course, they then turn-around charge an insane amount for a bottle of water; water in a bottle that is most likely going to end up in a landfill.

There are a few things you can do to prevent this.

  1. Bring a self-filtering water bottle:

    Brita and CamelBak both have versions that TxK and I have tested and liked. Just make sure you empty it before you go into the airport, I have had TSA agents threaten to toss mine a few times, because they can.

    His exact words, “even though that is empty, I can make you throw that away if I want.”

    To which I replied, “of course you can.”

    The bottles filter the water as you drink it, so you can fill it up at a public drinking fountain or bubbler.

  2. Make friends with a short drip:

    Bring a regular water bottle and buy a “short drip” (10oz drip coffee – kids hot chocolate size) or a banana or something at your airport Starbucks.

    Starbucks filters their water to ensure standardized taste for their coffee beverages. As a result the cold water they use for iced drinks is also filtered. In my experience, the stands I have approached in the airport will not always fill my water bottle for free, but they will fill it for a purchase of a beverage.

The earth will thank you.

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Wicked Good Lobstah Suppah, paht 1 – Lobster Lessons by quornflour

I headed out to Seattle for work and am staying with friends while I am here. While talking, we decided it would be fun to have a little lobster dinner. Then I wanted to invite some friends and it turned into a full-fledged feast. Next thing I knew there were 24 lobsters and 6 pounds of mussels headed to Seattle: I ordered them from Maine Lobster Direct, and you can too.

We did a basic lesson on lobster, from what I could remember learning as a kid growing up in Maine. Pincher and Crusher claws…

Often when people draw lobster they show 2 crusher claws, the crusher claw is very likely what you imagine when you think of a lobster claw. It is the bigger of the two claws, the one with more meat in it. What a lot of people do not realize is that lobsters have two different claws and are both “left handed” and “right handed”. IOW the crusher claw is not always on the left or right. The Pincher claw is faster and when a lobster is young has two pincher claws, but as it gets older the claw that is used less for quickness is the one that develops into the crusher claw.

Sometimes when you see lobsters in a tank they will only have one claw banded, this is the crusher claw, it looks like it has molars on it compared to the other that has more of a small tooth look to it.

The Crusher claw is used for just that, and while small can be very strong and is capable of breaking a human finger. Once the crusher claw develops it is the final determination on if the lobster will be left handed or right handed and this will not change as the lobster ages. Lobsters can regenerate lost claws and if a crusher claw is lost it will always regenerate as a crusher.

When boiling a lobster, you want to cook it for 11 minutes for the first pound and a minute for every quarter pound after that. When cooking, you do not need to add anything to the water.

Overall lobster is pretty healthy as a protein source. They are low in fat (most of the fat calories in a lobster dinner come from dipping the meat in butter), there are only about 30 calories per ounce of meat; a 1.5 pound lobster will yield about 4.25 ounces of meat.

When serving your lobster, try using a bread tin, this will allow the water to drain out when you break the shell and reduce the mess on the table, it also works as a place to put your shell when done.




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